Tan Wei Jie

weijie (at) tanwj.com

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O-Level/A-Level Private Tuition for Mathematics and Physics

A Singapore-Based Electronic Guidebook for Mathematics

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  • 19Apr

    Wet markets are a common sight in many neighbourhoods around Singapore, and is part and parcel of the weekly routine of a number of residents they serve. It is said to meet the basic needs of the community, providing a convenient space for interaction among members of the public. The stallholders would use ice to ensure that the seafood is fresh, and from time to time, clean their stalls with water. Due to the wet floors, these markets are commonly known as wet markets.

    Four new stamps featuring common sights in wet markets were released on 18 April 2012.

    Back in the 19th century, markets used to comprise loose clusters of vendors and peddlers with their wares spread out neatly on the ground or in baskets. In 1822, a market was constructed near the north end of Market Street, under the order of Sir Stamford Raffles. In the 20th century, more wet markets were developed to house street hawkers.  Many of these markets were integrated with the development of public housing in the 1950s and 1960s, as part of a neighbourhood centre, gathering residents around the area.

    Today, there 107 markets cum hawker centres located across Singapore. Over the next decade, 10 more hawker centres will be built, with emphasis on hygiene and cleanliness. Eventually, wet markets will be drier and their existence will be very much a part of history.

    Denomination: 4 designs of 80 c
    Stamp size: 40 mm by 30 mm
    Perforation: 16
    Sheet content: 10
    Designer: Andrew Tan (Drewscape)

    Images and adapted text: Singapore Post

    Posted by Wei Jie @ 19:24

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